Crelos October 2011 Newsletter

Crelos Newsletter

October 2011

Welcome to the Crelos regular update

A powerful question has the capacity to “travel well”, that is to spread beyond the place where it began into larger networks of conversation throughout an organization or a community. Questions that travel well are often the key to large-scale change.

Unfortunately, there is a prevailing belief in corporate life that “real work” consists primarily of detailed analysis (often delivered by “experts”), immediate decisions, and decisive action. This directly contradicts the perspective that effective knowledge-based change work consists of asking profound questions and hosting wide-ranging strategic conversations on issues of substance.

Leaders believe that they are being paid for fixing problems rather than for fostering breakthrough thinking and our reward systems support this behaviour. Between our deep attachment to the answer-any answer-and our anxiety over not knowing, we have inadvertently thwarted our collective capacity for deep creativity and fresh perspectives.

Unfortunately, given the unprecedented challenges we face both in our own organizations and as a global community, we need these skills now more than ever.

As we enter an era in which systemic issues often lie at the root of critical challenges, where diverse perspectives are required for sustainable solutions, and where cause-and-effect relationships are not immediately apparent, the capacity to raise penetrating questions that challenge current operating assumptions is key to creating a positive future.

In this issue we focus on the role of clear thinking in creating executable strategies for change. In the second article in our Change Mastery Series, Alan Little focuses attention on the real challenge of creating executable change strategy, while our Electrocomponents Plc case study offers an example of one organisations’ approach to developing leadership thinking using our proven Think-IN methodology.

Ali Gill
CEO, Crelos Ltd




At A Glance...

Shaping our current thinking

In Practice

Events

Did you know?

Shaping our current thinking

In this, the second article of the Crelos Change Mastery Series, Alan Little examines the role of strategic thinking in creating executable strategies for change. The research is based on interviews with CEOs and strategy directors from a range of organisations.

It highlights the paradox that many businesses express disappointment with their change strategy process in spite of all of the academic development and management education over half a century or more. It identifies the critical requirements for effective strategic thinking, especially design of an effective process and development of competence in strategic thinking behaviours and concludes that the cost-benefit of investment in superior capability in this area is compelling.

Read the full article

In Practice

Delivering change in organisations is not about individual charismatic leaders or leader led big events, it is about systematic thinking in groups, groups who by creating the right conditions solve their own problems. This case study looks at the innovative approach taken by Electrocomponents plc to develop leadership thinking, by working with us to develop a modular strategic thinking programme.

Read the full article

Events

Crelos hold regular events on various organisational change related topics.

The Crelos Change Mastery Series - a date for your diary 26th January 2012, 28 Portland Place, London, W1B 1LY

We will be sending invitations and further details soon – in the meantime please book mark the date in your diary. Please contact charlotte.sampson@crelos.com to reserve your place.

Did you know?

In a McKinsey Quarterly survey of 2135 global executives (see Putting strategies to the test: McKinsey Global Survey Results, available on www.mckinseyquarterly.com).

  • Only 33% of respondents believed their strategies rested on unique and powerful insights
  • Only 12% placed novel insights among the top three strategic influencers of financial performance
  • One likely explanation: the widespread availability of information and adoption of sophisticated strategy frameworks creates an impression that “everyone knows what we know and is probably analysing the data in the same ways that we are.” If strategists questions their ability to generate novel insights, they are less likely to reach for the powerful insight that is most likely to differentiate them from competitors.

Dr Liz Mellon is Executive Director of Duke CE and author of ‘Inside the Leader’s Mind: Five Ways to Think Like a Leader’. Her book reveals the five common ways effective leaders think and gives you the tools you need to evolve your thinking and become a better leader - you can watch an interview about the book here